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Tag Archives: Red Cross

By: Maria Marabito 

Did you observe International Cat Day (August 8) this year? How about International Dog Day on August 26? As we turn the corner on this month, let’s acknowledge the special value of our animal companions, who have been at our side for centuries. Nobody knows your cat or dog like you do, so it’s important to learn how to help them when something goes wrong. The American Red Cross has a course to teach you exactly that.

When you take the Red Cross’s Cat & Dog First Aid online training course, you’ll discover how to properly check your pet’s vital signs, practice preventive care, and recognize and provide first aid for your cat or dog.

Knowing how to provide a safe, healthy life for your pet is the best way to show you care. This 35-minute online course is perfect for pet owners, pet sitters, and pet shop employees, because you never know when an emergency might arise. Whether your pet is a cuddly lap cat or a highly trained working dog, the course will prepare you to help in a time of need.  

Just like humans, cats and dogs can experience health crises like seizures, bleeding, breathing emergencies, and cardiac issues. The course covers those emergencies and more, and you’ll have the option to work through the material anytime and anywhere you want. You’ll also have continued access to the information in case you need to review it in the future. 

The training was developed by a Red Cross team of scientific and medical experts, so you know you’re getting reliable information. Reviews from past students have been overwhelmingly positive. PawsitiveZen gave the course five stars: “As a walker, I wanted to have some basic first aid understanding. This course provided me with exactly what I was looking for, and I now have more confidence to care for other furry family members. I encourage anyone who lives or works with pets to take this course.” 

Tbou also gave the course a five-star rating: “It was much easier than a whole day of in-person learning. It’s self-paced and easy to understand, and it will help me be a better volunteer.” 

A $25 course fee and a 35-minute investment of time—from the comfort of your home—is a small price for ensuring the safety of your furry family member. The pet-saving skills you’ll acquire will be invaluable. For info on the go, consider downloading the Red Cross’s award-winning Pet Safety app as well. That way you can access safety tips directly from your phone. 

The Red Cross values the well-being of your four-legged best friends, and this training tool can make you a better pet owner. When your cat or dog is in trouble, it’s hard to know what to do. This course and safety app will arm you with the skills and knowledge to handle a pet health emergency. 

Learn more: www.redcross.org/take-a-class/first-aid/cat-dog-first-aid

By: Huanjia Zhang 

From her job development work in Kentucky as a college student, to her efforts in Michigan to lend a hand with the Flint water crisis, to her travel to New Orleans to help communities rebuild after the floods, Mary Harper has never lacked energy for humanitarian causes.  

So it came as no surprise to her former colleagues at the City of Philadelphia that her retirement years would involve service. For 21 years, Harper oversaw the city’s mental illness and addiction treatment program; she retired on August 31, 2019, and by September she was already volunteering with the American Red Cross.  

“Volunteering for the community has always been in my DNA,” Harper says.  

Mary Harper volunteers at an SAF event in 2019.


In less than a year with the Red Cross, Harper has contributed to the Philadelphia chapter in numerous ways, including in her roles as a service associate for the Disaster Action Team and as a resiliency program lead for the Service to the Armed Forces. She loves both of those positions.  

As a Disaster Action Team member, Harper recalls being dispatched to an apartment fire this past June. When she arrived on the scene, she immediately recognized that some residents impacted by the fire were medically fragile, while others had mental challenges.  

“The scene was chaotic,” she says. “People were having difficulties navigating how to go to the hotel or use the taxi voucher.”  

One resident was having a complete meltdown, Harper recalls. With her experience in mental health services, she approached the frantic resident, calmed him down and comforted him, and explained the ways that the Red Cross was able to help him.  

Then came a turn of the events. “What really warmed my heart,” Harper says, “was to see the higher-functioning people starting to support the lower-functioning people. For me, that is [the essence of my role]. We help them, and then they help themselves.”  

Mary Harper poses with other Red Cross volunteers at the 2019 Veterans Parade in Philadelphia.

Harper is equally proud of what she and her team have achieved with the Resiliency Program for the Service to the Armed Forces. As a senior volunteer lead, Harper helps organize the COVID-19 resiliency workshop program. This is a series of self-care activities and support group conversations designed to help local returning veterans and their family members form communities and find the support they need to cope with the extraordinary challenges of the pandemic. So far Harper has helped organize more than 142 Zoom hours for these workshops.

“One thing I love about the Red Cross is how we respect and show real empathy and support to people. It’s more than just saying ‘I am so sorry’ to people,” she said.  “Instead, we offer real and useful services to the communities.”  

Harper lives with her daughter and grandchildren in the Germantown section of Philadelphia, where the coronavirus has transformed her household into a home school, a home camp, and a theater for daily talent shows. She plans to volunteer for the American Red Cross as long as she can. Why? “The Red Cross keeps me grounded. It keeps me connected to the community.”   

By Samantha Antenucci

As a loving pet owner, there’s nothing I wouldn’t do for my cat and five dogs (two of which are pictured below!). Pets are valuable family members—and as with any family member, they need to be looked after, especially when challenging weather poses health risks for them.  

This winter’s polar vortex in the Midwest and East Coast left single-digit temps and subzero wind chills in its wake. Although that episode has passed, it doesn’t mean winter has loosened its grip on the Northeast. We may still see subfreezing weather blast through before the season is over, and inclement conditions can stress our pets. Here are some simple guidelines to ensure that your furry friends survive the season. 

Keep ’em in if it’s cold out 

Yes, Fido has a fur coat, but extreme cold is dangerous for humans and animals alike. So bring your pet indoors when temperatures dip. If it’s an outdoor pet, it still needs warm indoor shelter during freezing and below-freezing temps. The rest of the time, your pet needs an enclosure that protects it from wind, rain, and snow. The size of the enclosure matters—it should be large enough for the animal to sit and lie down, but small enough to ensure conservation of body heat. It should also face away from any wind and be elevated above ground to prevent further heat loss. It is also good practice to cover the doorway with a waterproof material for warmth and to keep the elements out.  

Wipe those salty paws 

Unless you’re in the country, chances are that after a storm, your streets and sidewalks are heavily treated with salt or chemical deicers. These compounds can stick to your dog’s paw pads during a walk,  causing major irritation. In addition, if Fido tries to lick his pads clean, the salt and chemicals can make him sick. So make a habit of ending your winter walks by wiping off your dog’s feet with a damp cloth or towel, and checking regularly for cracked or bleeding paws. 

Avoid household hazards  

Speaking of chemicals, antifreeze is a deadly poison that’s often kept indoors. Its sweet taste attracts animals and ingestion can lead to death. Keep this and other household chemicals safely stored, and clean up any spills immediately.  

Consider the local critters  

Your own pets are not the only animals who may suffer in winter, so keep an eye out for creatures in need. Neighborhood cats have been known to crawl under car hoods or onto the tops of tires to keep warm. Before starting your engine in the morning, bang on the hood to scare away any animals that could be hiding inside. 

Expect the unexpected                               

Being prepared in winter is vital; extreme weather can knock out heat, power, and communications. Make a plan to deal with storms, and keep an emergency kit handy—including five days’ worth of food, water, and medications. That way you can better protect your whole family—and your pet—from unforeseen hardships.  

For more tips on weather safety for your pets, check out the American Red Cross’s Pet First Aid app. With veterinary advice and emergency preparedness info, the Pet First Aid app can help you keep your pets safe and warm this winter. To access all Red Cross apps, click here.

By Kathleen Huston

Safety is the Goal at Your Super Bowl Party

Quicker than you can say “double doink” (with a shout-out to my Philadelphia Eagles, who unfortunately didn’t make it this year), the Rams and the Patriots will go head to head in Atlanta, GA for Super Bowl LIII. Here are some timely tips to help ensure that all you fans out there don’t take a hit as well.

For the Host With the Most

The focus of your get-together should be on the five F’s: football, fun, family, friends and food. You might be watching for a while! The longest Super Bowl game was number XLII in 2013, clocking in at four hours and 14 minutes, according to Bustle.com.

In addition to your chips and dips and pizzas and wings, be sure to have healthier options on hand. Hummus, guacamole, veggies and dip, turkey chili with lots of healthy peppers and beans, nuts, and popcorn without butter all fit the bill. Also make sure nonalcoholic drinks (especially water) are in plentiful supply.

Finally, sure, your fun and festive football-themed hand towel in the bathroom is nice for guests to look at, but have disposable towels at the ready so they can avoid getting the last person’s germs. Also, make sure your hand soap dispenser is full. In that same vein, have serving utensils to use with each food item — even a spoon in the nut bowl — so guests don’t have to stick their hands in anything and risk spreading the flu virus.

For the Party People

Be sure to designate a sober driver before game day. If everyone in your group wants to imbibe, make sure you install a ride service app on your phone or have a taxi company number available in your contacts.

If you’re sick, don’t think you should rally and attend anyway. Stay home. You aren’t doing yourself any favors and nobody wants to score your cold or flu either. There’s always next year!

If you are the designated driver, practice defensive driving (as you always should). Snopes has confirmed time and again that car accidents soar after Super Bowls. “Even those fans who don’t drink during or after the game pose a risk to themselves and others once they hit the road because of the distraction factor,” it notes. Whether you’re wallowing in the fact that you’re team didn’t make the cut or celebrating your victory over and over again in your head, save those thoughts until you’re home safe and sound. You don’t want to be one of those distracted drivers yourself.

Download the App

To wrap it up, the Red Cross offers a free first-aid app you can install on your phone now. Among its many features, it provides tips and videos addressing common first-aid scenarios. Content is available in English and Spanish. Read more about it here.

By: Sophie Kluthe

My Experience 

I recently donated blood for the first time. It was something I’d always wanted to do, but couldn’t because of my travel history. I’ll admit, I was nervous at first because of a childhood fear of needles, but the staff at the donation center made my experience nearly painless. Especially compared to what the person who will receive my blood is going through.  

Feeling great after giving blood at the Blood Donation Center at 700 Spring Garden Street in Philadelphia.
Feeling great after giving blood at the Blood Donation Center at 700 Spring Garden Street in Philadelphia.

When I used to think about who was receiving these blood donations, I imagined car crash victims and other trauma patients. While these people do depend on life-saving blood, there are many others who rely on it as well. While I was rolling that foam ball around in my hand, I wondered if my blood might go to help a child battling leukemia, or a person who regularly needs blood transfusions to fight a chronic disease. Maybe it would it be used to help someone getting an organ transplant. Every two seconds someone in the United States needs a blood transfusion. If a trauma victim ends up in the emergency room, it’s the blood already on the shelves that will save their life.  

National Blood Donor Month 

This January the American Red Cross celebrates National Blood Donor Month, which has been observed in January since 1970 with the goal of increasing blood and platelet donations during winter. The colder months are typically the most difficult times of year to collect enough blood products to meet patient needs. During the winter months, bad weather often results in cancelled blood drives, and seasonal illnesses like the flu may cause some donors to become temporarily unable to donate. This winter, the need is especially urgent, since there weren’t as many people who donated in the fall compared to years past.

A Sweet Incentive

Throughout the month of January, presenting donors in Southern New Jersey and Southeast Pennsylvania will receive a voucher for a free medium Dunkin’ hot coffee and a classic donut, redeemable at participating Dunkin’ restaurants in the Greater Philadelphia Region, while supplies last. Blood donation appointments can be made by downloading the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting redcrossblood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) to make an appointment or to receive more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. 

Regional Red Cross CEO, Guy Triano, kicks off the January promotion alongside Jessica Weissman, Integrated Marketing Manager for Philadelphia, Dunkin’ Brands

A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements. 

Blood donors can now save time at their next donation by using RapidPass to complete their pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire online, on the day of their donation, prior to arriving at the blood drive. To get started and learn more, visit redcrossblood.org/RapidPass and follow the instructions on the site. 

Written by Sam Antenucci

My father is a universal donor, meaning he can donate his blood to anyone who needs it. He donated as frequently as he could, often donating plasma as well. He did this for years, up until he was diagnosed with cancer.

Knowing that blood can help burn-victims, transplant patients, those battling cancer etc., made me want to step up and take my father’s place on the donation table. Every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs blood, making donations not just important but the difference between life and death.

Blood Drive at the Rayburn House Building Capitol Hill 2017

My first donation was in September of 2014 and I had some concerns going into my first blood drive. Like many other first-time donors, I didn’t like needles. I walked into a room bustling with nurses, donors and soft rock playing in the background. I was greeted by the warm faces of volunteers at the registration table and led to the back for a mini-physical where I answered a few general health questions and had my vitals taken. Once the physical was finished, I was on track to donate.

I laid down on the table as the nurse and I chatted away about being a first-time donor. She explained everything and tried to ease my fear of needles, reminding me that each donation goes to those in need. Before I knew it, the needle was in with a slight pinch and I was only ten minutes away from filling my first pint of blood! Between the music and the friendly staff, time zipped by and I was able to hop off the table and enjoy the refreshments waiting for donors afterwards. From there, my blood was sent to the blood donation center in Philadelphia for processing and testing.

Four years later, I’m still donating to this day, especially since blood supplies have been noticeably low during the summer months. To make matters worse, the number of Red Cross donors decreased each year, leaving many hospital’s supplies low, shelves empty and patients in dire need of transfusions. Now is better than ever to make the decision to save lives by donating blood.

3 livesBy taking 15 minutes out of your day to donate blood, you can save three lives and give patients a chance to keep fighting. You don’t need a special reason to give blood, just one that motivates you. Some donate because of friends, some do it because they believe it is the right thing to do, and there are some who do it for the free cookies. Regardless of the reason to give blood, I would like to offer advice for new-donor jitters – take pride in the good you are doing, relax with music or chat with the staff, and be prepared before you donate by eating a good meal with plenty of water. It is a rewarding experience that changes the lives of those in need.

 

To find more information on where you can donate, you can go to https://rdcrss.org/2ORL31P to find a blood drive near you.

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On Tuesday, December 2, 2014 people from around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give. Giving Tuesday is a global day dedicated to giving back. We have a day for giving thanks, two days for getting deals, and on #GivingTuesday charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students will come together to give something more.

timeThe American Red Cross relies on the generosity of those looking to give back to our humanitarian mission. From providing disaster relief, to responding to local emergencies, to educating communities on lifesaving preparedness and training, to supporting our military and their families, our work is only made possible by donors and volunteers.

This #GivingTuesday choose to give your time, your money or your blood to the American Red Cross.

The 2014 American Red Cross Holiday Gift Catalog provides a list of gifts that support our military, ease urgent needs, and help spread global compassion. Gift prices start at $15.00, which will provide fire safety training and the installation of one fire alarm to help keep families safe and prepared. Gift prices range all the way to $1,000.00, providing a full day of emergency shelter for 20 people, which includes three meals, two blankets, one cot, snacks and personal hygiene supplies. Free gifts are included with donation while supplies last. For a complete list of gifts, please click here.unselfie movement

In addition to making a financial donation, volunteering your time is another way to contribute to #GivingTuesday. Getting involved is an easy way to give back to your local community this holiday season. To join the team of volunteers delivering care and compassion to those in need everyday, please click here. And don’t forget that the American Red Cross supplies more than 40% of the nation’s blood supply, so we are always in need of more donations. You can sign up to make a blood donation or host a virtual blood drive right on our website.FAB_give_blood

Now here’s the best part. Throughout the day on #GivingTuesday the American Red Cross of Eastern Pennsylvania will be following along on social media as you tweet, post, like, and share how you are contributing to #GivingTuesday. You can take a photo, video, or post an #UNSelfie of your #GivingTuesday activities to join in the worldwide movement. We look forward to seeing the global impact of everyone’s contributions and activities on #GivingTuesday and hearing all about #WhyIGive.

 

-Submitted by Jessica Webb, Communications Volunteer

Submitted in part by Carnelita Slaughter, Red Cross Volunteer

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Whether you are playing chaperone or getting together with friends, like me, you have probably been planning our Halloween festivities for weeks. Now it’s crunch time! Your frightful crew is gathering and your decorations are sending chills up the neighbors’ spines (you’ve done well). But you may be forgetting something…….. the greatest hazards of Halloween aren’t the spirits trying to communicate through your Ouija board or the creatures you’ll encounter throughout the night. No! There are other dangers that come with wandering around in the dark in busy neighborhood with uneven street lighting and small children. Good thing you have the Red Cross to guide you. We can’t promise you won’t suffer a tummy ache or sore feet but stick with us and you’ll celebrate many Spooktacular evenings to come!

 

  1. Look for flame resistant costumes.

Homer's burning Halloween

2. Try to stick with make-up instead of masks to make sure trick-or-treaters can see clearly as they walk the neighborhood.

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3. Plan your Trick-or-Treat route in advance.
Trick or Treat Route

A parent or responsible adult should accompany young children as they make their way around the neighborhood.

4. Make it easy to be seen in the dark.
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Make sure trick-or-treaters have flashlights. Put reflective tape on dark colored costumes, or try to stick with light colored costumes.

5. Only visit homes that have the porch light on.

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Accept treats at the door but never go inside.

 

6. Only walk on sidewalks.
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If no sidewalk is available, walk at the edge of the roadway, facing traffic. Look both ways before crossing the street and cross only at the corner. Don’t cut across yards or use alleys. And don’t cross between parked cars

7. Be cautious around pets and other animals.
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8. Use glow sticks or LEDs inside jack-o-lanterns instead of candles.

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For more tips and information click here, and be sure to download our Red Cross First Aid App at redcross.org/apps.

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-submitted by Sarah Peterson, communications volunteer

Did you know that Benjamin Franklin was responsible for setting up the first fire company in Philadelphia? On a visit to see his family Boston, he observed that Bostonians were much better equipped to fight fires and save lives than the people of Philadelphia. According to the website, ushistory.org, after consulting with civic leaders in Philadelphia, he gathered 30 young men together to form the Union Fire Company on December 7, 1736. These men had special equipment provided by the community, and they began meeting regularly to practice their techniques and discuss successful firefighting procedures.

In order to raise public awareness, Franklin began writing about fire safety in his newspaper, the Pennsylvania Gazette. In one article, written in 1735, he cautions his fellow citizens against moving hot coals from room to room on an open shovel, in case one ember is lost under the stairs and results in a middle-of-the-night,“when your Stairs being in Flames, you may be forced, (as I once was) to leap out of your Windows, and hazard your Necks to avoid being oven-roasted.”

rco_blog_img_BenFranklinFire safety awareness has improved since the 1700s. No doubt Franklin would have been thrilled by the efficacy of smoke detectors, but we still struggle to make sure fire safety measures are protecting everyone.  On October 3rd, 2014, the White House released a proclamation by President Obama to mark Fire Prevention Week and to remind all Americans of the danger of fire. He urged all of us to practice evacuations plans from our homes, schools and places of business. He urged Americans who live near woodlands to practice caution and clear flammable vegetation from around buildings. He reminded all of us that, “During Fire Prevention Week, we recognize our duty to be vigilant and take action to avert fires, and we remember the sacrifices of those who gave their lives so others might live.”

That’s why the Pennsylvania State House also took some time this week to recognize National Fire Prevention Week. According to State Senator Rob Teplitz, the week commemorates the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 and was first designated in 1920. It is still unclear how the devastating fire in Chicago got started, but it burned for two days, destroyed 3.3 square miles of the city’s central business district, killed up to 300 people and left more than 100,000 residents homeless. In 1920, officials decided that such a massive disaster deserved the be remembered in a way that could help everyone learn more about fire safety and prevention and President Woodrow Wilson released the first National Fire Prevention Week Proclamation.

Appropriately, this year’s theme is “Smoke alarms save lives: Test yours every month.” As Franklin surely knew when warning about embers in an open shovel, home fire deaths are preventable but require residents to take care. We no longer worry about lost embers, but we must test our smoke alarms regularly and change the batteries twice a year.

As Franklin writes in 1735, “In the first Place, as an Ounce of Prevention is worth a Pound of Cure” we must all be vigilant against the dangers of fire. We remember terrible disasters like the Chicago fire by taking the time to remind ourselves of this basic truth. Check your batteries, everyone! Take the time to practice an escape route from your home. And don’t carry those embers in an open shovel.

rco_blog_img_PREPARESeptember is National Preparedness Month, and it’s important to remember that emergencies can happen anywhere and at any time. Most of us have plans in place at home for emergencies like illness or natural disasters, but is your workplace prepared for these events? There’s a good chance that your employer has emergency procedures like building evacuation in place and has an easily-accessible first aid kit and automated external defibrillator (AED). However, your co-workers may not be aware of how to respond to emergencies or use equipment like an AED. The American Red Cross can help your workplace prepare for emergencies through services like safety assessment, training, and certification programs.

You can always find emergency preparedness information at Redcross.org, but the following programs can help your workplace better respond to emergencies.

American Red Cross Ready Rating Program 

The American Red Cross Ready Rating™, a first-of-its-kind membership program designed to help businesses and organizations become better prepared for emergencies. Membership is free, and the program is self-paced. After joining, members complete a 123-point self-assessment to find areas of improvement for emergency preparedness.

Workers learn tips and best practices for emergencies. Most importantly, members make a commitment to improve their readiness score each year in a continuing process.m10643684_241x164-learning-aed

Employee Training

The American Red Cross provides flexible training options for workplaces that meet OSHA, corporate, and other regulatory standards. From on-site employee CPR and First Aid training, to access to community classes, employers can work with employees to find the best training options based on their needs.

Instructor Training

If your workplace has a designated emergency response or health and safety team leader, they can benefit from receiving training from the American Red Cross. After completing Red Cross training, your workplace instructor can lead their own training sessions on emergency response topics like First Aid/CPR and other areas that are relevant to your field.

download workplace safetyFor more information on all Workplace Safety Training and Preparedness Programs available through the American Red Cross, see the online catalog here.